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Month in the Hive – July

 

Now that you have your bees and they have been pollinating the flowers and trees the past few months, it’s time to stand back and let them make that delicious honey!

July is honey-making month, so it’s a good time to let the bees be as they work their honey magic. You do, however, want to keep an eye out for any swarms during this time. When this happens, the reigning queen and about half the bees will rush out of the hive entrance together, clustering on a tree limb or another similar object. This is called swarming, and usually only lasts for an hour or so as the bees look for a new home. Once the bees have found a new location, the cluster breaks up and the bees fly to their new hive.

The bees that did not leave the hive continue their work in the colony, collecting nectar and pollen and building honey combs. Within the colony, a new queen emerges and looks for rival queens. A fight-to-the-death combat ensues until there is only one surviving queen. Once the new queen has mated, she begins to lay eggs and the cycle begins again.

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Month in the Hive – March

March is here! This is an integral time for the health of your bees. Just because the temperature is increasing, doesn’t mean your bees will survive. You’ll likely see lots of bee deaths this month, so it’s important to check the hive and clear out the dead bees to ensure proper ventilation into the hive. A good time to check on the bees is on the days when the temperature hits 50 F.

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GLBC Press in The Michigan Farmer

Farm Progress, an agricultural and farming publication with a local Michigan focused publication called Michigan Farmerwrote a story about GLBC. The article gives a brief background on Genji’s story, the importance of pollinators in the agricultural business, details about buying bees, and information on how to get started beekeeping.

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DIY Bee Bath: Hydration Station for Bees

Do you want to make sure your garden is blooming to its max capacity this season? Ensure your flora are all being pollinated by creating an environment where bees want to and CAN visit while on their journey for nectar. It takes more than just flowers to draw bees in. You need to give them a reason to stay and linger long enough so they don’t overlook your many flowers. Having flowers and nectar for bees to consume is essential to attracting them, but an often overlooked necessity for bees is water.

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What is Swarming and Why Bees Do it

 
 
Have you ever seen the wondrous sight of bees, tightly grouped around each other in a giant pile wrapped around a tree branch or other mechanism that exists outside of the hive? Do not fret and do not call an exterminator! These insects are able to sting, but will only do so when disturbed. The swarm you see might look scary, but these bees are not interested in you or stinging you. In fact, they are far more busy trying to find a new home. That’s right- you just stumbled upon a colony of bees in the middle of a move!

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How Pollination Works

 
 
Like all living things, plants want to reproduce. Reproduction happens when a male fertilizes a female. Plants reproduce similarly by making seeds after being fertilized. In order for plants to make seeds, plants must first be pollinated. Pollination is the process by which the male part of a plant fertilizes the female part of another plant (of the same species). The male part of a plant produces pollen, which then must travel to the female part of another plant in order to fertilize it. Plants can’t pick up their feet and walk like other living animals. The male part of the plant relies on external forces to transfer the pollen to other plants, like bees.

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GLBC’s Makes News in the Detroit Free Press

 
 
The Detroit Free Press gave us a visit at Kropscott Farms last Saturday to write a story about us and our first bee pick-up day of 2021.  The article covers details about our pick-up event this year like who comes to pick up our bees and why. She also answers questions about the bees themselves including where the bees “vacation” during the Michigan winters and how important bees are for pollinating the crops of local farms.

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Co-Founder of GLBC Interviews with WGVU’s Radio Host Shelley Irwin

 
 
Co-Founder of GLBC and master beekeeper Genji Leclair interviewed on the radio with WGVU’s Morning Show host and producer Shelley Irwin. On Shelley’s segment, Genji talked everything bees. Genji explained how we repurpose honey and beeswax and even how pollination works. As a queen bee herself, Genji goes in depth about the science behind Queen Bees and then transitions to talking about our recent bee-pick-up event where beekeepers and farmers from around the Midwest come to pick-up new bees.

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